FAQs

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Common Questions. Enlightened Answers.

Q:  Who can benefit from enlightened parenting coaching?

A:  Anyone who is responsible for the well-being of children in their care including parents, legal guardians, grandparents, step-parents, nannies, caregivers, camp counselors  and teachers, just to name a few.

 

Q:  Why is it important to practice mindful, enlightened parenting?

A:   To help the children in our care become more self-confident, responsible, and capable adults who learn to trust their instincts, enhance their resiliency, and regulate their emotions and reactions.

 

Q:  How long does it take to become a more enlightened parent?

A:  This is a discipline which has no beginning and no end. While it can take a few sessions to become familiar with this new way of thinking, being and responding, for some it may take longer to understand and implement. Ultimately, this practice is a life-long endeavor which involves becoming ever more aware and present in each moment as we encounter our children.

 

Q:  Does it always work?

A:  There are no guarantees about outcome; in fact the work centers on the process of becoming more enlightened without regard to outcome. Ultimately, the practice involves acceptance of our children in their “as is” state without judgment or criticism.

 

Q:  Does the practice of enlightened parenting conflict with others values?

A:  NO. This work is centered around helping to instill and promote widely held values such as respect for self and others, empathy and gratitude.

 

Q:  Is it best to work with the coach individually or in group setting?

A:  That is a personal preference. Individual sessions allow you and the coach to focus on the particular issues and needs of your family; group work allows parents to learn about what others are going through and affords a confidential support network.

 

Q:  Is the cost of coaching sessions covered by insurance or health savings accounts?

A:  NO. This is strictly a coaching practice which is not intended to substitute for medical or psychological care. Parents must seek such care as they deem necessary for their children. Parents can be guided by discussions with the coach and are free to accept or reject her suggestions however they must be mindful of the fact that the coach is not a health care professional.